Tuesday, January 25, 2011

Little Red Riding Hood

“She said to her, “Grandmother, what great arms you have!”
“That’s to embrace you the better, my child.”
“Grandmother, what great legs you have!”
“That’s to run the better, my child.”
“Grandmother, what great ears you have!”
“That’s to hear the better, my child.”
“Grandmother, what great teeth you have!”
“That’s for to eat you.”
And upon saying these words, this naughty Wolf threw himself upon Little Red Riding Hood, and ate her.”
(Charles Perrault - Little Red Riding Hood)



Another one of my favorite fairy tales. Beautiful girl and a Big Bad Wolf...Creepy? Scary? Morbid? Kinky? Overtly moralized? Depends of which version of the story you've read. The story went through a lot of changes and adaptations, but again the main versions of the story are those recorded by Charles Perrault and the Grimm brothers. 



The origins of the Little Red Riding Hood story can be traced to oral versions from various European countries and more than likely preceding the 17th century, of which several exist, some significantly different from the currently-known, Grimms-inspired version. It was told by French peasants in the 14th century as well as in Italy, where a number of versions exist, including La finta nonna (The False Grandmother). It has also been called as "The Story of Grandmother". It is also possible that this early tale has roots in very similar Oriental tales (e.g. "Grandaunt Tiger").
These early variations of the tale differ from the currently known version in several ways. The antagonist is not always a wolf, but sometimes an ogre or a ‘bzou’ (werewolf), making these tales relevant to the werewolf-trials (similar to witch trials) of the time (e.g. the trial of Peter Stumpp). The wolf usually leaves the grandmother’s blood and meat for the girl to eat, who then unwittingly cannibalises her own grandmother. Furthermore, the wolf was also known to ask her to remove her clothing and toss it into the fire. In some versions, the wolf eats the girl after she gets into bed with him, and the story ends there. In others, she sees through his disguise and tries to escape, complaining to her "grandmother" that she needs to defecate and would not wish to do so in the bed. The wolf reluctantly lets her go, tied to a piece of string so she does not get away. However, the girl slips the string over something else and runs off.
In these stories she escapes with no help from any male or older female figure, instead using her own cunning. Sometimes, though more rarely, the red hood is even non-existent.
 (taken from Wikipedia) 



It came to my attention that a movie is being made. 
Release date: 11 March 2011. 


Gary Oldman is The Hunter. 
Director: Catherine Hardwicke...(I'm not very happy about that). 



I do hope that this movie will be worth watching!

2 comments: